Antonin Rodet Rully Blanc 2016
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This is a white wine imageAntonin Rodet Rully Blanc 2016

 
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100 Chardonnay

Floral aromas on the nose of hawthorn and acacia, with a tinge of lemon. The palate reveals a floral wine with woody notes and a touch of citrus. The finale is rich with a sensation of roundness in the mouth. This wine will be perfect paired with charcuterie platters (ham or pts) or sea food (scallop-shells, salmon). It can also be drunk with hot first courses, such as quiches and pies, ... read more
Item ID: #40805
Size: 750mL (wine)
Closure: Cork

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100 Chardonnay

Floral aromas on the nose of hawthorn and acacia, with a tinge of lemon. The palate reveals a floral wine with woody notes and a touch of citrus. The finale is rich with a sensation of roundness in the mouth. This wine will be perfect paired with charcuterie platters (ham or pts) or sea food (scallop-shells, salmon). It can also be drunk with hot first courses, such as quiches and pies, or with dry cheeses (goats cheese for instance). Serve ideally between 12 and 14 C / 54 and 57F

VINIFICATION
The grapes were pressed in a pneumatic press to squeeze out their juice. This juice was left to settle at cold temperatures between 16 and 24 hours maximum in order to remove impurities. The alcoholic fermentation took place in vats to allow for a better control of temperatures, key element in our search for pure color and bright aromas. Then, just before the fermentation ended, the wine was cashed into oak barrels to age in on its lees for several months. Actually, it is still a feint at the moment and until the malolactic fermentation is over, we are stirring it on occasions (about twice a month).

VINTAGE 2016
As the saying goes, nothing is a foregone conclusion, and the climate in Burgundy for this vintage comes as a proof of its accuracy. A rather mild winter made us think we would have an early vintage. Although, even if we knew we would go through the now traditional climatic hazards, we were far from the truth! Actually, the whims of the weather were so important that we worried a lot. Indeed, spring played havoc with our nerves with a rollercoaster of frost, rainfalls and cold, bringing its share of diseases in the vineyards. We had to fight hard against the threat of mildew, botrytis and even odium in the end. Luckily for us, summer was quite sunny and made up for the hard times. Another evidence that patience and perseverance are the keys which solve everything, and that a bad start is in no case an indication of the final result. Finally, this vintage was exhausting with a late harvest but the low yields and a sunny summer helped getting beautiful ripe grapes with a great aromatic potential. Harvest started with the sun on September, 22nd and lasted until October, 7th. Grapes were ripe and healthy, in variable amounts depending on the plots, as some of them suffered from the frosting that occurred in spring. White grapes had good natural degrees when harvested; the wines are still ageing but already show great fruitiness and elegance.

HISTORY
Antonin Rodet runs the vineyard of this ancient fortified Chteau dating back to the 12th Century, symbol of the village of Rully, and property of the same family since its origins. 12 hectares, of which one third are Premier Crus, producing about 80 white wines. Rully is a communal appellation made up of 23 Premiers Crus climats. White Rullys spread on a 261 ha area - including 68 ha of Premiers Crus - whereas red Rullys are produced on a 116 ha area of which 28 are Premiers Crus. Rully was named after a rich roman, Rubilius, who built a villa and founded the village during the roman occupation. It was at first named Rubiliacum and it evolved through the years to become the current Rully.

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