Empire Wine & Liquor logo Empire Too Groceries logo
Home » Wine » Sparkling Wine » Bubbly Dry » Dom Perignon Brut 2003
Dom Perignon Brut 2003Sample Image Only
Dom Perignon Brut 2003
Wine Advocate 94+
"Unfortunately there is only one new release from Dom Perignon this year. The 2003 is one of the most unusual Dom Perignons I have ever tasted, going back to 1952. Readers will remember that 2003 was a torrid vintage across northern Europe, especially during the critical month of August, when temperatures remained very hot for well over a month. The harvest was the earliest on record, until 2011, that is. I suppose its ... read more
Item Sold Out

While this item is not available, here are a few that are!

Size:750mL (bubbly)
Closure:Cork
Store Item ID:#11975
Item Description
Wine Advocate 94+
"Unfortunately there is only one new release from Dom Perignon this year. The 2003 is one of the most unusual Dom Perignons I have ever tasted, going back to 1952. Readers will remember that 2003 was a torrid vintage across northern Europe, especially during the critical month of August, when temperatures remained very hot for well over a month. The harvest was the earliest on record, until 2011, that is. I suppose its not that surprising Chef de Caves Richard Geoffroy chose to make a 2003 Dom Perignon, given his penchant for risk-taking, an approach that has yielded so many memorable wines that stretch the perception of what big brand Champagne is and can be.

The 2003 Dom Perignon is a big, broad shouldered wine. It does not have the seductiveness of the 2000, nor the power of the 2002. It is instead very much its own wine. In 2003 Geoffroy elected to use more Pinot Noir than is typically the case, and that comes through in the wine’s breath and volume. The 2003 is a big, powerful Champagne that will require quite a bit of time to shed some of its baby fat. The trademark textural finesse is there, though. I expect the 2003 to be a highly divisive Champagne because of its extreme personality, but then again, many of the world’s legendary wines were made from vintages considered freakish at the time. The 2003 is an atypically, rich, powerful, vinous Dom Perignon loaded with fruit, structure and personality. It is not for the timid, but rather it is a wine for those who can be patient.

No one has a crystal ball, but personally I will not be surprised if in 20 years’ time the 2003 is considered an iconic Champagne. Anticipated maturity: 2016-2038."

Wine Spectator 94
"The Moet & Chandon Brut Champagne Cuvee Dom Perignon 2003, which will be released early next year, displayed rich aromas of honey, brioche and hints of vanilla. Though round and sumptuous, there was bright citrus, peach and a focus on the finish that retained elegance, freshness, finesse and complexity (94 points, non-blind). With air, it became more textural, with a ginger note and a distinctive mineral streak."

" The bouquet spirals through a light-filled, floral softness to the gritty minerality that epitomises Dom Perignon, evocative of candied fruit, plant life and exquisite camphor leaf freshness, and finally plunges into darkness, spices and licorice root. On the palate, the wine still has a physical presence. It is striking and demading, tactile and vibrant rather than aromatic. It is built on rhythm and rupture more than harmony. After an initial cloud of stofness, we hit a mineralised verticality that gradually opens out to suggest a bitter, iodised and saline nobility." ~ Winery notes
About Dom Perignon
Dom Pérignon (1638–1715) was a monk and cellar master at the Benedictine abbey in Hautvillers. He pioneered a number of winemaking techniques around 1670--being the first to blend grapes in such a way as to improve the quality of wines, balance one element with another in order to make a better whole, and deal with a number of their imperfections; perfecting the art of producing clear white wines from black grapes by clever manipulation of the presses; enhancing the tendency of Champagne wines to retain their natural sugar in order to naturally induce secondary fermentation in the Spring; being a master at deciding when to bottle these wines in order to capture the bubble. He also introduced corks (instead of wood), which were fastened to bottles with hemp string soaked in oil in order to keep the wines fresh and sparkling, and used thicker glass in order to strengthen the bottles (which were prone to explode at that time).[2] The development of sparkling wines as the main style of production in Champagne occurred progressively in the 19th century, more than a century after Dom Pérignon's death.
Dom Perignon
No questions posted yet about this item.
Be the first to reivew this item!
Subscribe to our newsletter!
Subscribe to our email newsletter to receive early discount offers, latest news, sales and promo information!