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Mayacamas 'Mt. Veeder' Cabernet Sauvignon 2014
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This is a red wine imageMayacamas 'Mt. Veeder' Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

$162$117.95
 
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James Suckling 97
" Aromas of blackcurrant, mushroom, wet earth and bark follow through to a full body, chewy tannins and a stone, berry, chili and spice aftertaste. Muscular and chunky. Very serious. Almost no new oak. This shows the Mayacamas DNA. October 2018 release."

Vinous Media 96+
"The 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon shows the best qualities of the year to great effect. Powerful, incisive and tannic, yet also medium-bodied in structure, the 2014 is laser-focused and exceptionally beautiful. ... read more
This is a red wine
Item ID: #31610
Size: 750mL (wine)
Closure: Cork

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Item Description

James Suckling 97
" Aromas of blackcurrant, mushroom, wet earth and bark follow through to a full body, chewy tannins and a stone, berry, chili and spice aftertaste. Muscular and chunky. Very serious. Almost no new oak. This shows the Mayacamas DNA. October 2018 release."

Vinous Media 96+
"The 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon shows the best qualities of the year to great effect. Powerful, incisive and tannic, yet also medium-bodied in structure, the 2014 is laser-focused and exceptionally beautiful. Precision and finely sculpted, the 2014 is going to need at least a few years to come into its own, but it is incredibly vivid and poised, even at this early stage. Red fruit, wild flowers, orange peel and chalk add brightness throughout. -- Antonio Galloni"

Jeb Dunnuck 96
"An incredible wine that reminds me of a great vintage of Lafite, the 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon is a step up over the 2012, with more depth, richness, and elegance as well as texture. Stunning notes of red and blackcurrants, lead pencil shavings, cigar tobacco, and cedar all emerge from this incredibly elegant, ethereal, yet layered 2014 that has present yet polished tannin, impeccable balance, and sensational purity of fruit. It certainly offers pleasure today (more than the 2012) yet will benefit from 5-7 years of bottle age and keep for 2-3 decades. Its a brilliant, classic, old-school styled Napa Cabernet done perfectly!"

Wine Spectator 95
"This packs in a lot of juicy black currant and blackberry paste notes, with lively licorice snap and bramble accents filling the available space. A roasted apple wood accent lends a mouthwatering edge while a tarry echo at the very end adds range and length. Should cruise in the cellar. Best from 2020 through 2045. 4,396 cases made. JM"

The Wine
First Cabernet produced by Andy Erickson
Harvest began on September 10th, ended October 8th
Fermented in concrete fermenters, open-top foudre and stainless steel
After two weeks on skins, gently pressed to neutral oak for 32 months: 20 months in large format foudre and 12 months in barrique
Cellared for an additional 12 months in bottle before release

The Winery
At the crest of Mount Veeder, a sinuous appellation that clings to the Mayacamas Mountains southern reaches, rests Mayacamas Vineyards as it has for over a century. Here, at 2,400 feet, above the din of Napas valley floor, fifty acres of vines quietly speak to both an unshakeable past and a fortitude for the future. Their fruit find its voice in a stone cellar built in 1889, and, when bottled, it shares with us a story of humility and commitment unadorned, with concentration, elegance, and balance.

Initially built in 1889 by JH Fisher, a German immigrant and pickle merchant in San Francisco, the winery was largely abandoned from the time of the 1906 earthquake until 1941. Guests of the Lokoya Lodge on Mount Veeder, Jack Taylor, a chemist for Shell, and his wife, Mary, purchased the property the winery and its 260 acres and with their three children founded Mayacamas. They began by planting the property to Chardonnay, using budwood purchased from the Wente Livermore Valley Vineyard just like their northerly neighbors, the McCreas of Stony Hill. Cabernet Sauvignon plantings followed, and Mayacamas was bonded (#4417) in 1947.

Next came Robert Travers, under whose stewardship Mayacamas found the voice it shares in present day. The son of a farming family, Travers wavered from a trajectory in engineering and finance, and, bolstered by his studies in wine, turned to Joe Heitz for a single harvest. After a year with Heitz, and the ongoing mentorship of Andr Tchelistcheff, Travers, only thirty, purchased Mayacamas from the Taylors. The estates winemaker, Bob Sessions who would later, to legendary acclaim, become synonymous with Hanzell remained by Traverss side until 1971.

Since 2013, the Schottenstein family and winemaker Andy Erickson have rigorously attended to the identity of Mayacamas not merely with the intention of preservation, but invigoration. Working with Travers in the 2012 vintage, the winemaking team learned to forgo new oak and instead implement the winerys existing old casks anything that still held wine. Only minor changes have since been implemented, including cooling equipment to stabilize fermentations and lengthen macerations (from twelve days to perhaps twenty). Greater work stood before them in the estates fifty planted acres. The winery called on Phil Cotturi, to replant the ailing, phylloxera-afflicted AXR-rooted vines, and to institute organic viticulture and continue dry-farming. The replanting process only about five acres per year promises to revive the estates yields for the next generation

Mayacamas

View all from Mayacamas
MayacamasAt the crest of Mount Veeder, a sinuous appellation that clings to the Mayacamas Mountains' southern reaches, rests Mayacamas Vineyards – as it has for over a century. Here, at 2,400 feet, above the din of Napa's valley floor, fifty acres of vines quietly speak to both an unshakeable past and a fortitude for the future. Their fruit find its voice in a stone cellar built in 1889, and, when bottled, it shares with us a story of humility and commitment – unadorned, with concentration, elegance, and balance.

Initially built in 1889 by JH Fisher, a German immigrant and pickle merchant in San Francisco, the winery was largely abandoned from the time of the 1906 earthquake until 1941. Guests of the Lokoya Lodge on Mount Veeder, Jack Taylor, a chemist for Shell, and his wife, Mary, purchased the property – the winery and its 260 acres – and with their three children founded Mayacamas. They began by planting the property to Chardonnay, using budwood purchased from the Wente Livermore Valley Vineyard – just like their northerly neighbors, the McCreas of Stony Hill. Cabernet Sauvignon plantings followed, and Mayacamas was bonded (#4417) in 1947.

Next came Robert Travers, under whose stewardship Mayacamas found the voice it shares in present day. The son of a farming family, Travers wavered from a trajectory in engineering and finance, and, bolstered by his studies in wine, turned to Joe Heitz for a single harvest. After a year with Heitz, and the ongoing mentorship of André Tchelistcheff, Travers, only thirty, purchased Mayacamas from the Taylors. The estate's winemaker, Bob Sessions – who would later, to legendary acclaim, become synonymous with Hanzell – remained by Travers's side until 1971.

Since 2013, the Schottenstein family and winemaker Andy Erickson have rigorously attended to the identity of Mayacamas – not merely with the intention of preservation, but invigoration. Working with Travers in the 2012 vintage, the winemaking team learned to forgo new oak and instead implement the winery's existing old casks – anything that still held wine. Only minor changes have since been implemented, including cooling equipment to stabilize fermentations and lengthen macerations (from twelve days to perhaps twenty). Greater work stood before them in the estate's fifty planted acres. The winery called on Phil Cotturi, to replant the ailing, phylloxera-afflicted AXR-rooted vines, and to institute organic viticulture and continue dry-farming. The replanting process – only about five acres per year – promises to revive the estate's yields for the next generation

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