Mayacamas 'Mt. Veeder' Chardonnay 2015
sample imgsample image only

This is a white wine imageMayacamas 'Mt. Veeder' Chardonnay 2015

 
Item Sold Out
While this item isn't currently available:
Vinous Media 95
"The 2015 Chardonnay emerges from dry-farmed, old vines on the property. In this vintage, the Chardonnay is surprisingly rich and unctuous yet it also retains its mid-weight feel. Orchard fruit, white flowers and mint, along with slightly tropical overtones, give the 2015 much of its distinctive personality. Readers who can find the 2015 should plan on cellaring it for at least a few years, as the wine needs time to shed its baby ... read more
This is a white wine
Item ID: #30153
Size: 750mL (wine)
Closure: Cork

Other Similar Items

Info

Item Description

Vinous Media 95
"The 2015 Chardonnay emerges from dry-farmed, old vines on the property. In this vintage, the Chardonnay is surprisingly rich and unctuous yet it also retains its mid-weight feel. Orchard fruit, white flowers and mint, along with slightly tropical overtones, give the 2015 much of its distinctive personality. Readers who can find the 2015 should plan on cellaring it for at least a few years, as the wine needs time to shed its baby fat. Tasted again after the reds, with a good 30 minutes in the glass, the Chardonnay is flat-out gorgeous. About 80% of the wine spent time in larger foudres, which likely helped it retain a measure of freshness. -- Antonio Galloni"

The Wine
Exclusively sourced from Mt. Veeder – harvested from 40-year old dry-farmed vines between 1,800 and 2,000 feet in elevation
Erickson’s third vintage, now inclusive of partial neutral barrel fermentation
Whole-cluster pressed, fermented in a combination of small barrels (7% new), stainless, and large foudres
Seven months on the lees, ten months of total aging
MLF was inhibited, bottle-aged for nine months before release

The Estate
At the crest of Mount Veeder, a sinuous appellation that clings to the Mayacamas Mountains’ southern reaches, rests Mayacamas Vineyards – as it has for over a century. Here, at 2,400 feet, above the din of Napa’s valley floor, fifty acres of vines quietly speak to both an unshakeable past and a fortitude for the future. Their fruit find its voice in a stone cellar built in 1889, and, when bottled, it shares with us a story of humility and commitment – unadorned, with concentration, elegance, and balance.

Initially built in 1889 by JH Fisher, a German immigrant and pickle merchant in San Francisco, the winery was largely abandoned from the time of the 1906 earthquake until 1941. Guests of the Lokoya Lodge on Mount Veeder, Jack Taylor, a chemist for Shell, and his wife, Mary, purchased the property – the winery and its 260 acres – and with their three children founded Mayacamas. They began by planting the property to Chardonnay, using budwood purchased from the Wente Livermore Valley Vineyard – just like their northerly neighbors, the McCreas of Stony Hill. Cabernet Sauvignon plantings followed, and Mayacamas was bonded (#4417) in 1947.

Next came Robert Travers, under whose stewardship Mayacamas found the voice it shares in present day. The son of a farming family, Travers wavered from a trajectory in engineering and finance, and, bolstered by his studies in wine, turned to Joe Heitz for a single harvest. After a year with Heitz, and the ongoing mentorship of André Tchelistcheff, Travers, only thirty, purchased Mayacamas from the Taylors. The estate’s winemaker, Bob Sessions – who would later, to legendary acclaim, become synonymous with Hanzell – remained by Travers’s side until 1971.

Since 2013, the Schottenstein family and winemaker Andy Erickson have rigorously attended to the identity of Mayacamas – not merely with the intention of preservation, but invigoration. Working with Travers in the 2012 vintage, the winemaking team learned to forgo new oak and instead implement the winery’s existing old casks – anything that still held wine. Only minor changes have since been implemented, including cooling equipment to stabilize fermentations and lengthen macerations (from twelve days to perhaps twenty). Greater work stood before them in the estate’s fifty planted acres. The winery called on Phil Cotturi, to replant the ailing, phylloxera-afflicted AXR-rooted vines, and to institute organic viticulture and continue dry-farming. The replanting process – only about five acres per year – promises to revive the estate’s yields for the next generation

Mayacamas

View all from Mayacamas
MayacamasAt the crest of Mount Veeder, a sinuous appellation that clings to the Mayacamas Mountains' southern reaches, rests Mayacamas Vineyards – as it has for over a century. Here, at 2,400 feet, above the din of Napa's valley floor, fifty acres of vines quietly speak to both an unshakeable past and a fortitude for the future. Their fruit find its voice in a stone cellar built in 1889, and, when bottled, it shares with us a story of humility and commitment – unadorned, with concentration, elegance, and balance.

Initially built in 1889 by JH Fisher, a German immigrant and pickle merchant in San Francisco, the winery was largely abandoned from the time of the 1906 earthquake until 1941. Guests of the Lokoya Lodge on Mount Veeder, Jack Taylor, a chemist for Shell, and his wife, Mary, purchased the property – the winery and its 260 acres – and with their three children founded Mayacamas. They began by planting the property to Chardonnay, using budwood purchased from the Wente Livermore Valley Vineyard – just like their northerly neighbors, the McCreas of Stony Hill. Cabernet Sauvignon plantings followed, and Mayacamas was bonded (#4417) in 1947.

Next came Robert Travers, under whose stewardship Mayacamas found the voice it shares in present day. The son of a farming family, Travers wavered from a trajectory in engineering and finance, and, bolstered by his studies in wine, turned to Joe Heitz for a single harvest. After a year with Heitz, and the ongoing mentorship of André Tchelistcheff, Travers, only thirty, purchased Mayacamas from the Taylors. The estate's winemaker, Bob Sessions – who would later, to legendary acclaim, become synonymous with Hanzell – remained by Travers's side until 1971.

Since 2013, the Schottenstein family and winemaker Andy Erickson have rigorously attended to the identity of Mayacamas – not merely with the intention of preservation, but invigoration. Working with Travers in the 2012 vintage, the winemaking team learned to forgo new oak and instead implement the winery's existing old casks – anything that still held wine. Only minor changes have since been implemented, including cooling equipment to stabilize fermentations and lengthen macerations (from twelve days to perhaps twenty). Greater work stood before them in the estate's fifty planted acres. The winery called on Phil Cotturi, to replant the ailing, phylloxera-afflicted AXR-rooted vines, and to institute organic viticulture and continue dry-farming. The replanting process – only about five acres per year – promises to revive the estate's yields for the next generation

Questions

No questions posted yet about this item.

Reviews

Be the first to reivew this item!
Scroll to the top of this page