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Taittinger 'Prelude' Brut Grand Crus NVSample Image Only
Taittinger 'Prelude' Brut Grand Crus NV
$132.27$94.95
Wine Enthusiast 94
Made from only Grand Cru vineyards, this ripe, full and wonderfully textured wine is rich and complex. It brings out tangy orange and lemon zest, a tightly mineral texture, fragrant fruit and acidity. Dense and concentrated, the wine would benefit from some bottle age to bring out all its flavors. (RV)

Wine Advocate 93
The NV Brut Prlude Grands Crus has a very clear, complex and fresh yet intense bouquet, currently with more Pinot and ... read more
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Shelf Location — 16d
Size:750mL (bubbly)
Alcohol by vol:12.5%
Closure:Cork
Store Item ID:#6761
Location at store:16d
Item Description
Wine Enthusiast 94
Made from only Grand Cru vineyards, this ripe, full and wonderfully textured wine is rich and complex. It brings out tangy orange and lemon zest, a tightly mineral texture, fragrant fruit and acidity. Dense and concentrated, the wine would benefit from some bottle age to bring out all its flavors. (RV)

Wine Advocate 93
The NV Brut Prlude Grands Crus has a very clear, complex and fresh yet intense bouquet, currently with more Pinot and walnut/macadamia flavors rather than Chardonnay flavors. Almond biscuits and fine brioche aromas come through only on the second nose. Bottled in 2012, this should be based on the 2011 vintage. It is a full-bodied, fine and elegant but also very complex and persistent Prlude that was sourced in only grand cru vineyards. Disgorged in October 2016 (dosage: nine grams per liter), tasted in November 2017. (SR)

Burghound 92
There is just a hint of reduction present that shaves the top notes off of the otherwise yeasty green apple and subtle floral aromas. There is fine complexity to the equally yeasty flavors where the supporting effervescence is not particularly refined though it's by no means rustic either, all wrapped in a lingering and sappy finish. I suppose if I'm being really nitpicky this lacks just a touch of freshness and verve even though it's clear that the idea here is to deliver a wine with real depth. I would be the first to acknowledge that it is very difficult to deliver depth with freshness because of the very nature of developing the complexity in the first place. Still, it can be done and this, while certainly delicious and attractive, lacks that little extra dimension that separates the very best cuves from the 'merely' excellent.

Vinous Media 91
Pale gold. Vibrant, mineral-laced citrus and orchard fruit aromas are complemented by suggestions of buttered toast and honey. Toasty orange and pear flavors are braced by juicy acidity, picking up a suggestion of chamomile with air. Finishes dry and precise, with repeating mineral and toast notes. (JR)

Wine & Spirits 90
This is a substantial, full-bodied 50-50 blend of Chardonnay from Avize and Le Mesnil-sur-Oger with Pinot Noir from the Montagne de Reims. It balances savory, nutty aromas of yeast autolysis with bright, zesty orange and deeper, red fruit essences. The wines persistent acidity keeps its plump body firm.

Wine Spectator 90
Fine and lacy in texture, this clean-cut Champagne in an aperitif style offers a subtle mix of patisserie apple and pear, lemon zest, pickled ginger and orchard blossom notes. Fresh, with a lightly toasty finish. Drink now through 2019. (AN, Web-2016)
About Taittinger
In 1734, Jacques Fourneaux established a wine-business in Champagne and worked closely with the Benedictine Abbeys which, at that time, owned the finest vineyards in the region. After the First World War, the wine-house was moved to a large mansion on the Rue de Tambour in which Theobald I of Navarre (1201–1253) had lived. A long-standing legend held that it was he who brought the Chardonnay grape from Cyprus on returning from a crusade in the Middle Ages. This has been disproved by genetic analysis done at the University of California at Davis.[2]

The Taittingers were a family of wine merchants who, in 1870, moved to the Paris region from the Lorraine in order to retain their French citizenship after the Franco-Prussian War and the Treaty of Frankfurt (1871).

In 1932, Pierre Taittinger bought the Château de la Marquetterie from the wine house of Forest-Fourneaux. It had been used as a command post during World War I and he had been laid up there after suffering a heart-attack during combat. The vineyards of the château had been planted with Chardonnay and Pinot noir since the 18th Century. This property had been developed by Brother Jean Oudart, a Benedictine monk, one of the founding fathers of champagne wine, and later it had belonged to the writer Jacques Cazotte.

From 1945 to 1960 the business was run by Pierre's third son François. Under his direction, the Taittinger cellars were established in the Abbey of Saint-Nicaise, built in the thirteenth century in Gallo-Roman chalk pits dating from the fourth century. After François' death in an accident, his brother Claude took over and directed the business from 1960 to 2005. It was during this time that Taittinger became a champagne house of world renown.

Champagne Taittinger was sold in July 2005 by the Taittinger family, along with its subsidiary, Société du Louvre, to the U.S. private investment firm Starwood Capital Group. Those in the profession (Champagne houses, wine-producers, cooperatives, distributors and customers) proposed that the objectives of short-term profitability, or even medium term, at any price, advocated by the then current managers of the business, were not compatible with the production of Champagne wine of quality, which takes time, trust and a large delegation of authority to the masters of the cellar. In addition, the arrival of investors completely foreign to the culture of Champagne could result in a major breakdown of the equilibrium of the industry.

Finally, on 31 May 2006, the Northeast Regional Bank of the Crédit Agricole, in collaboration with Pierre-Emmanuel Taittinger, bought the business for 660 million euros. The area covers 288.84 hectares of vineyards and has 12 to 13 million bottles in stock. The Château de la Marquetterie and its cellars were part of the overall purchase. The Starwood group retained some hotels, including luxury hotels Crillon, Lutetia and Martinez, and the hotel chains Campanile and Kyriad.

Claude Taittinger retired in 2006 and his nephew Pierre-Emmanuel Taittinger replaced him as head of the business.
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